Posted On 2014/06/17 By In Behavior, News, China Outbound, Destinations, Food With 812 Views

Chinese Tourists in Love with Taiwanese Fruits

Pineapples, mangoes, wax apples, sugar apples and guavas are the Taiwanese fruits that Chinese tourists appreciate the most, and do not hesitate to dispatch them in order to satisfy their palettes, as reported by the China Times.

In the night markets of southern Taiwan’s Kaohsiung city, where Chinese tourists often spend their Renminbi on Taiwanese fruits, shouts of, “the trash can is here!” from stand owners are ubiquitous. Their cries are preventative; Chinese tourists’ first reaction when they have fruit seeds in their mouth or peels in their hand is to spit and throw them on the ground.

A fruit stand on the side of an interchange in the southern Chiayi county, that used to be run by a couple who modestly grew pineapples nearby had to hire five employees to meet the increasing demand from Chinese tourists. The annual turnover of the fruit stand is now NT$1 million (US$33,330).

Most Chinese tourists eat their fruits on site, because it is impossible for them to take back to China. The most appreciated fruits in the northern Taipei’s Shihlin night market are sugar apples, wax apples, mangoes and pineapples. Most of the 20 fruit stands would tourists have a free sample before they take out their money. But once there is a business opportunity, the Taiwanese fruits are weighed with an electronic balance that measures to the gram.

Tourists do not complain about the prices because most of them were previously told that the fruits in night markets would cost more when they are prepared and ready to eat.


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Sources:

Article: Want China Times / Image: Aaron Shumaker

Pineapples, mangoes, wax apples, sugar apples and guavas are the Taiwanese fruits that Chinese tourists appreciate the most, and do not hesitate to dispatch them in order to satisfy their palettes, as reported by the China Times. In the night markets of southern Taiwan's Kaohsiung city, where Chinese tourists often spend their Renminbi on Taiwanese fruits, shouts of, "the trash can is here!" from stand owners are ubiquitous. Their cries are preventative; Chinese tourists' first reaction when they have fruit seeds in their mouth or peels in their hand is to spit and throw them on the ground. A fruit stand on the side of an interchange in the southern Chiayi county, that used to be run by a couple who modestly grew pineapples nearby had to hire five employees to meet the increasing demand from Chinese tourists. The annual turnover of the fruit stand is now NT$1 million (US$33,330). Most Chinese tourists eat their fruits on site, because it is impossible for them to take back to China. The most appreciated fruits in the northern Taipei's Shihlin night market are sugar apples, wax apples, mangoes and pineapples. Most of the 20 fruit stands would tourists have a free sample before they take out their money. But once there is a business opportunity, the Taiwanese fruits are weighed with an electronic balance that measures to the gram. Tourists do not complain about the prices because most of them were previously told that the fruits in night markets would cost more when they are prepared and ready to eat. Learn more in our Global Ready China Seminars Sources: Article: Want China Times / Image: Aaron Shumaker

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About

David

David Lee, educated in Denmark, China and the UK, gained extensive work experience with NGOs (Int"l Red Cross and UNESCO) as well as in the fields of training and education. He is part of BMG's China office and supports services like translation, localization, market research and analysis as well as social media planning and management. David also has in-depth insight into the Chinese travel, shopping and luxury market, paired with creativity, business acumen and a passion for Social Media.

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