Posted On 2014/07/26 By In Behavior, Chinese Perspective, Economics, News, Government With 601 Views

No more fancy Gifts for Chinese Officials

China is warning its officials to keep away from luxury mooncakes, even though the round pastry-featured Mid-Autumn Festival is still one and a half months away. A notice released by the central authorities on Thursday has barred officials buying gifts and giving bonuses with public money during any holidays including the Mid-Autumn Festival. The festival has long been associated with corruption and extravagance with its gift-giving custom among officials. A specialty for the festival, mooncakes, used to pop up in ornate boxes along with fancy goodies to make them presentable gifts to, mostly, officials and bosses.

The latest ban is necessary to constrain the bad custom from resurging, after a nationwide austerity campaign brought a lull to the practice last year. In fact, documents of bans have been circulated around every holiday and key occasions during the whole year, leaving no room for Chinese officials’ neglect of frugality. Like a stubborn illness, a bad practice can’t be “cured” by a single remedy, instead it needs a lasting medication. Last year’s campaign largely suppressed the practice, but obviously it has not been rooted out and has turned underground.

Different from openly promoting mooncakes in supermarkets and hotels before, businessmen have adopted for a more “covert” way. They have replaced the cakes with shopping cards and coupons, made deals online and given gifts by express delivery. They rack their brains to find ways of gift giving “more safe” and low profile. However, trying to disguise corruption will only lead to stronger inspections and a crackdown from the authorities. China’s anti-graft chief Wang Qishan vowed earlier this month to maintain a “high-voltage” crackdown on corruption and sharpen the “Sword of Damocles” hanging over officials. In June, anti-graft authorities punished 6,601 people for breaching anti-extravagance rules, including receiving fancy gifts, feasting on and travel with public funds.

There are some officials and businessmen thinking the austerity drive as a short episode for the new leadership to declare their power and will be relaxed sooner or later. Unfortunately they are terribly wrong. They have underestimated the leadership’s resolution to wipe out the internal bad practice and punish corrupt officials, which the Party regards as the biggest peril for its survival. Those with the illusion would better give it up soon and forever.


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Sources:

Article: Global Post

China is warning its officials to keep away from luxury mooncakes, even though the round pastry-featured Mid-Autumn Festival is still one and a half months away. A notice released by the central authorities on Thursday has barred officials buying gifts and giving bonuses with public money during any holidays including the Mid-Autumn Festival. The festival has long been associated with corruption and extravagance with its gift-giving custom among officials. A specialty for the festival, mooncakes, used to pop up in ornate boxes along with fancy goodies to make them presentable gifts to, mostly, officials and bosses. The latest ban is necessary to constrain the bad custom from resurging, after a nationwide austerity campaign brought a lull to the practice last year. In fact, documents of bans have been circulated around every holiday and key occasions during the whole year, leaving no room for Chinese officials' neglect of frugality. Like a stubborn illness, a bad practice can't be "cured" by a single remedy, instead it needs a lasting medication. Last year's campaign largely suppressed the practice, but obviously it has not been rooted out and has turned underground. Different from openly promoting mooncakes in supermarkets and hotels before, businessmen have adopted for a more "covert" way. They have replaced the cakes with shopping cards and coupons, made deals online and given gifts by express delivery. They rack their brains to find ways of gift giving "more safe" and low profile. However, trying to disguise corruption will only lead to stronger inspections and a crackdown from the authorities. China's anti-graft chief Wang Qishan vowed earlier this month to maintain a "high-voltage" crackdown on corruption and sharpen the "Sword of Damocles" hanging over officials. In June, anti-graft authorities punished 6,601 people for breaching anti-extravagance rules, including receiving fancy gifts, feasting on and travel with public funds. There are some officials and businessmen thinking the austerity drive as a short episode for the new leadership to declare their power and will be relaxed sooner or later. Unfortunately they are terribly wrong. They have underestimated the leadership's resolution to wipe out the internal bad practice and punish corrupt officials, which the Party regards as the biggest peril for its survival. Those with the illusion would better give it up soon and forever. Learn more in our Global Ready China Seminars Sources: Article: Global Post

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Glenda

Glenda (a California native who began her hospitality and tourism career in Hawaii) has been in the travel and tourism industry for over 25 years and is currently a marketing consultant with the California Travel and Tourism Commission. Glenda’s experience in travel trade training and development was pivotal to the success of opening new tourism offices in Brazil, China, Mexico, Australia, and Korea. In her tenure at the CTTC, Glenda organized sales missions, travel trade and media events worldwide.

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